Women United 10th Anniversary Luncheon

November 5, 2015, 11:30am

Farmington Country Club

Margaret May DamenAt our 10th Anniversary Luncheon on November 5, 2015, Women United was thrilled to announce our 2015 Human Services Grant Award Recipients! This year we awarded two $25,000 grants to Charlottesville Works Initiative and Foothills Child Advocacy Center.  And, in honor of Women United's 10th anniversary, we awarded an additional $10,000 grant to City of Promise.

Our keynote speaker was Margaret May Damen, founder of the Institute for Women and Wealth and Co-Author of Women, Wealth and Giving: The Virtuous Legacy of the Boom Generation. Her focus on women’s financial and philanthropic issues began in 1990 with the publication of her book, Money$ense for Women. Today, her renowned workshop series, “The Life You Live is the Legacy You Leave,” and “You are the Pebble in The Pond” inspire and empower women and men to identify and embrace their psychological and emotional essence that enables them to excel in meaningful individual and family philanthropic giving by using tools from the 10 Steps to Living the Three Principles of Abundance. ™

To learn more about Ms. Damen and her work, CLICK HERE.

Special thanks to our 2015 Luncheon Sponsors:

 WilliamsMullenLogo ClubRed-new red 

 

2015 Grant Finalists Presentation

Tuesday, September 22nd, 5:00-7:00pm

Omni Hotel Charlottesville, Salon C

This year on our 10th Anniversary, we are thrilled to be awarding $60,000 in grants to local human service organizations!  Our Grant Committee received 12 excellent proposals, and has carefully reviewed and narrowed down to a selective group of 5 finalists:

Charlottesville Works:

In the Charlottesville region, 5,281 families (17 percent), mostly single mothers and their children, do not make enough money to pay for the essentials of life—food, shelter, clothing and utilities—and the added costs associated with working—childcare and transportation.  The goal of the Charlottesville Works Initiative is to identify these families and increase their income to a level of self-sufficiency by identifying jobs within their reach and positioning them to secure and excel in those jobs.

City of Promise:

Charlottesville’s City of Promise (CoP) is seeking a grant to provide evidence-based academic coaching for 20 youth ages 12-17 in the City of Promise Neighborhood (Westhaven, 10th& Page, Starr Hill). Students will be selected on the basis of need, and will also receive wrap-around supports through City of Promise and its community partners to ensure their ability to thrive academically, personally and eventually professionally.

Club Yancey:

The Albemarle County Board of Supervisors and the Albemarle School Board created a workgroup through charter to explore and recommend potential community wide use of B.F Yancey Elementary School. This application is based on the nine- month process of that workgroup to identify needs, interests and potential partners to create an intergenerational education center for the Southern Albemarle Community and funding to support these expansion efforts.

Foothills CAC:

Foothills Child Advocacy Center respectfully requests a grant to provide training for professionals who serve child abuse victims and their families so that they can continue to provide a coordinated, evidence-based, culturally competent, and compassionate response that helps reduce trauma for these children, ensure their healing, and keep them safe. These trainings will address two new and significant challenges in child abuse intervention: (1) identifying and providing an appropriate response to victims of human trafficking under the age of 18 in the Charlottesville/Albemarle area and (2) improving medical care of child abuse victims in the community.

Piedmont CASA:

Piedmont CASA recruits, screens, trains, supervises and supports community Volunteers who advocate in Court for abused and neglected children. CASA Volunteers conduct independent investigations and make recommendations to the judges regarding the children’s best interest, always promoting safe, permanent, and nurturing homes.

Closing the STEM Gender Gap

Closing The STEM Gender Gap

On February 24, 2015 Women United brought together a panel of community members to discuss their perspectives on how we, as a community, can help expose girls to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields and encourage those who are interested to follow their hearts and minds. 

Moderator:

Adrian Felts, Operatations Manager, Battelle; Director, Virginia Piedmont Regional Science Fair

Panelists:

Joan Vienvenue, PhD, Director, Applied Research Institute, University of Virginia

Mary Stelow, Charlottesville High School Junior; Robotics Innovator; Member, Best All-round Club of Nerds (BACON)

Paula White, Gifted Resource Teacher, Albemarle County Public Schools; Founder, Girls' Geek Day Program

The event began with a video introduction of the "Like a Girl" campaign ad and excerpts from the WTJU Radio interview with panelist and Girls Geek Day Founder, Paula White, followed by an introduction to our topic and Panelists by Moderator, Adrian Felts.

Panelists, who represented three very different aspects of involvement in STEM, were each granted a few minutes to introduce themselves to the audience, giving a brief overview on their own journey as a female involved in STEM fields.  Following introductions the audience was given a chance to ask questions to our panelists and exciting, information-rich discussion quickly ensued.   

If you are interested in learning more about STEM opportunities in our community and on-line download the STEM Resource sheet from the event HERE or contact panelist Paula White at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or  Tech-Girls.com Founder, Kim Wilkens at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

2014 Grant Award luncheon with Anne-Marie Slaughter

At our 2014 Human Services Grant Award Luncheon on November 21, 2014 at Farmington Country Club, Women United awarded two $22,500 grants - a total of $45,000 - to Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Central Blue Ridge and Ready Kids Cville (formerly CYFS). With these grants, Women United will have awarded $312,825 to local organizations since our first Human Services Grant Award in 2006.

Women United welcomed Dr. Anne-Marie Slaughter as keynote speaker for the luncheon.  A Charlottesville native, Dr. Slaughter is currently the president and CEO of the New America Foundation, a public policy institute and idea incubator based in Washington and New York.  In 2012 Dr. Slaughter published the article “Why Women Still Can’t Have It All,” in The Atlantic, which quickly became the most read article in the history of the magazine and helped spawn a renewed national debate on the continued obstacles to genuine full male-female equality.

2013 Grant Award Luncheon

On Tuesday, October 1, Women United was very excited to announce our 2013 Human Services Grant Award Recipients! This year we awarded two $20,000 grants to local non-profits serving women and children in our area:

Blue Ridge Area Food Bank - The Food Bank has created a Family BackPack Program to alleviate child food insecurity at the household level. Children receiving free and reduced-price lunches through the National School Lunch Program have an increased risk of hunger on weekends or over school holidays. This initiative aims to send a backpack full of healthy foods home with each eligible child every weekend and holiday. Women United's $20,000 grant will fund the Family BackPack Program for 2 years at Yancey Elementary, where 61.9% of families live between 0-185% of the federal poverty level.

Jefferson Area CHIP - Jefferson Area Children’s Health Improvement Program (CHiP) will use their $20,000 Women United grant to to support the salary of a Family Support Worker/Parent Educator who will conduct at least monthly home visits with 50 children ages 0-7 over the next year. CHIp's mission is to provide early learning opportunities to children living in poverty in Charlottesville and Albemarle in order to promote kindergarten readiness and to increase the likelihood of continued school success. CHiP family support workers and nurses partner with parents to provide a nurturing, stimulating, and optimal early learning environment for young children.

The keynote speaker at our Luncheon was award-winning journalist Lynn Povich, author of The Good Girls Revolt, her first-hand story of the landmark 1970 sex-discrimination lawsuit against Newsweek, it’s impact on the women involved, and what has and hasn’t changed. Ms. Povich spoke of the power of working together for a cause - something we at Women United are learning more about every day. Learn more about Ms. Povich here: www.LynnPovich.com.

Special thanks to our 2013 Luncheon Sponsors:

 
   
   

2013 Grant Semi-Finalists

2013 Grant Semi-FinalistsOn May 6, members of Women United gathered to hear from 5 non-profits hoping to receive one of our 2013 Human Service Grant Awards. This year, we are awarding two grants at $20,000 each. Our 2013 Grant Semi-Finalists include:

Blue Ridge Area Food Bank - The Food Bank has created a Family BackPack Program to alleviate child food insecurity at the household level. Children receiving free and reduced-price lunches through the National School Lunch Program have an increased risk of hunger on weekends or over school holidays. This initiative aims to send a backpack full of healthy foods home with each eligible child every weekend and holiday. A $20,000 grant from Women United would fund the Family BackPack Program for 2 years at Yancey Elementary, where 61.9% of families live between 0-185% of the federal poverty level.

Children, Youth & Family Services - CYFS hopes to use a Women United grant to help fund their ParentingMobile, a fully-equipped mobile classroom bringing parenting education, support and early learning playgroups to low income neighborhoods in Charlottesville and Albemarle that are isolated by poverty, language and cultural barriers. The ParentingMobile is staffed by CYFS Parent Educators and community volunteers who bring structured weekly on-site playgroups with tailored curricula to support increased family participation and meet the unique needs of the children in each neighborhood it serves, including Parks Edge, Friendship Court, Blue Ridge Commons and Southwood.

Friends of the Southern Albemarle Intergenerational Community Center - This organization requests funds for an educationally-based after school program at B.F. Yancey Elementary School. Known as Club Yancey, this program offers at-risk youth structured and safe after-school creative activities, help with homework, and other enrichment activities. Previously funded by a 21st Century grant, the program was free to students. Now that they have lost that grant, Club Yancey has had to charge up to $100 per child and thus has seen a significant drop in enrollment. A Women United grant would be used to provide partial and full scholarships for children whose parents are unable to pay tuition.

Hospice of the Piedmont - Hospice of the Piedmont asks for a grant of $20,000 to launch Piedmont Kids, a pediatric hospice program and philosophy of care for children facing a life-limiting illness or condition who have a life expectancy of months, not years. Hospice of the Piedmont envisions a day when no one in Central Virginia dies alone or in pain and intends to provide expert, compassionate care and support through Piedmont Kids. A Women United grant would be used to help fund the salaries of pediatric experts, to offer a variety of family support services for education, fun, and respite, and to customize grief support programming.

Jefferson Area CHIP - Jefferson Area Children’s Health Improvement Program (CHiP) requests $20,000 to provide early learning opportunities to children living in poverty in Charlottesville and Albemarle in order to promote kindergarten readiness and to increase the likelihood of continued school success. CHiP family support workers and nurses partner with parents to provide a nurturing, stimulating, and optimal early learning environment for young children utilizing the national early learning model Parents as Teachers and the Ages & Stages Questionnaire. A Women United grant would be used to support the salary of a Family Support Worker/Parent Educator who would conduct at least monthly home visits with 50 children ages 0-7 over the next year.

Each of these organizations has been through a rigorous evaluation by our 2013 Grant Committee. In February, all Donor and Corporate Members of Women United were asked to nominate non-profits. The Grant Committee researched each nomination and sent Request for Proposals (RFPs) to 11 organizations. The proposals were then reviewed to ensure that they fit with Women United's mission and a vote by private ballot was held. The five non-profits listed above received majority vote.

Now that we've heard directly from the 5 Semi-Finalists and the Grant Committee has conducted on-site visits of every organization, it will be up to our Donor and Corporate Members to decide. They will be sent the proposals and an online ballot in June. We will announce our two winners at our Annual Human Services Grant Award Luncheon this fall.

All Donor & Corporate Members are eligible to be a part of our Grant Committee and to vote on our recipients. To learn more, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .  

2013 Festival of the Book Event

Povich Book JacketWorking Women Sue for Equal Pay

On Friday, March 22, Women United sponsored a Festival of the Book event with Lynn Povich, author of The Good Girls Revolt: How the Women of Newsweek Sued their Bosses and Changed the Workplace. Ms. Povich discussed how she and her colleagues at Newsweek battled sexism in the media, the roles of other women who made and are making a difference, and the challenges that women still face in the workplace.

Nancy O'Brien, the first woman mayor of Charlottesville, led a lively conversation. Attendees included other women who had fought for equal rights in the 60's and 70's, younger women who benefited from that fight, and men who support us all.

Lynn Povich's Website

Festival of the Book Website

How Safe Are You?

Personal Safety Strategies for Women

Featuring Harvey Finkle, Certified National Crime Prevention Specialist

"Nobody is responsible for your safety but you." 

This was an important point made at the community event hosted by Women United on February 26, 2013. The discussion was led by Master Police Officer Harvey Finkel, one of only 50 Certified National Crime Prevention Specialists in the country. He went on to say:

"Trust your intuition. If it feels like a bad situation, it probably is. If it is an emergency TO YOU, call 911."

Officer Finkel provided information about personal and parking lot awareness, car and traffic safety, safety in crowds and shopping centers, home safety and even online safety tips. Here are just some of the tips we learned that day:

JOGGING: If you run alone, don't wear earbuds. Unaware runners are more likely to get injured, hit by a car or attacked. Never run alone in the dark.  

HANDBAGS: Lock your purse in your trunk if you don't need it to shop. Don't put it in your shopping cart. Don't carry it into festivals, concerts, Fridays After 5 or other crowded events.  

PEPPER SPRAY/TASERS/GUNS: Items carried in your handbag are useless. It takes too long to access them. Pepper spray is more likely to go off in your purse than to be useful in an attack.

PARKING LOTS: LOCK YOUR CAR and close your windows. Never leave personal items in view. Never leave a car running when you aren't in it. It takes 10 seconds to steal a car, and now the thief has your registration with your home address and maybe even the keys to your home.  

CAR BREAKDOWNS: Have a charged cell phone with you. If on the highway/remote area, call 911 as well as roadside assistance. Move to the passenger seat so passersby think there are 2 people.  

GETTING 'BUMPED' AT A LIGHT: Don't get out of your car and leave the key in the ignition, the person who hit you may be trying to steal the car. Call 911.

GETTING PULLED OVER: If you see the blue lights but can't see police markings, turn on your hazard lights and drive to the nearest populated area. If no populated area nearby, call 911 before pulling over and ask them to verify it is a real police car.

HOME SAFETY TIPS  

  • Don't open the door to someone unless you are expecting them. Use peephole/window to verify identity. Delivery drivers should all be in uniform with logo'd truck. Tell them to leave packages on the doorstep. If someone is in need you can call 911 for them without letting them into your home.  
  • Get motion sensing lights in front and behind your house. Sound of a large dog barking will scare off intruders (real or recorded). Make sure your alarm system company has your most recent phone/cell number.  
  • Charlottesville police response should be about 5 minutes. Albemarle County only has 6 police officers covering 760 square miles at night.
  • When traveling, have a friend not only pick up mail but also move your car so it isn't stationary in your driveway. Have someone clean your walkway/driveway/car if it snows.

ONLINE SAFETY TIPS

  • Don't put the year of your birth and the city in which you live on social media. It opens you up to identity theft.  
  • Run anti-virus and malware on your computers. Password protect your phone.  
  • Your bank will NOT ask you for personal information via email. You can always print what you are sent and take it into the actual bank to verify.  
  • Only purchase from websites that start with HTTPS (not just HTTP). Look for the locked symbol at the bottom of the webpage, too.

 CLICK HERE to visit our Facebook Photo Album from the event. Photography by Jack Looney.

2012 Membership Open House

On November 13, Women United Members and friends gathered at the Ivy Inn for food, fun and philanthropy. We discussed our past success and our goal of growing Membership in order to grow the Collective Fund. Our goal for 2013 is $50,000 for local non-profits!

A highlight of the evening was when the two 2011 Women United Grant recipients explained to the crowd of over 70 women what their organizations had done with Women United funds over the last year. The International Rescue Committee was there with goods created through their new Women's Craft Cooperative. Harriet Kuhr, IRC Executive Director, explained the process of teaching refugee women not only what crafts would sell in our area, but also how to balance a checkbook, manage money for their household, and be responsible for their own part of the business.

Rachel Lloyd Miller, pictured here 2nd from the left with Women United Steering Committee members Peppy Linden, Sue Friedman and Peggy Echols, discussed the mission of Piedmont CASA to train volunteers to become advocates for children in our community who are the victims of abuse and neglect. Women United funds have helped them serve over 200 children this year.

The Membership Open House was a great success. We saw some new faces and met new Members, and hope to continue to grow the Collective Fund.

CLICK HERE to join online now!

Picture courtesy of Peggy Harrison Photography. CLICK HERE for the full event photo album.

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